Metal recovery from spent samarium-cobalt magnets

Metal recovery from spent samarium-cobalt magnets

Researchers at SIM² KU Leuven have developed a new method to recover metals from spent samarium-cobalt magnets. The procedure involves oxidative dissolution of these metals in trichloride ionic liquids, followed by metal removal from the leachate with a series of...
New video released on first recyclable e-motor (EU DEMETER)

New video released on first recyclable e-motor (EU DEMETER)

Three years after launching its widely praised and award-winning first video, the ETN DEMETER team now proudly presents a follow-up animated video in which the flagship product of this 4 year-project is revealed. Meet the DEMETER e-motor, the first recyclable e-motor...
Reclaiming the treasure hidden in old CRT monitors and TVs

Reclaiming the treasure hidden in old CRT monitors and TVs

Within the EU H2020 REMAGHIC project, a process was developed by KU Leuven & TECNALIA to recover rare earths from CRT phosphor waste based on roasting and leaching with the green solvents acetic acid and methanesulphonic acid. The work is published in the Journal...
New process to recover indium from iron-rich solutions

New process to recover indium from iron-rich solutions

SIM² KU Leuven researchers developed a new, selective method to recover indium from iron-rich solutions. This work, funded through EU METGROW+, was published as a golden open access paper in the Journal Separation and Purification Technology. (PTJ, 12/12/2018) Indium...
Meet our SIM² KU Leuven researcher: Rayco Lommelen

Meet our SIM² KU Leuven researcher: Rayco Lommelen

Rayco Lommelen started his PhD in the SOLVOMET Group at SIM² KU Leuven in September 2018. He is working on the development of a better model to describe and predict solvent extractions and metal separations using basic extractants. Find out more about Rayco Lommelen...
Recovering rare earths from old TVs and computer screens

Recovering rare earths from old TVs and computer screens

Back in the old days, TVs were heavier, bulkier and hotter (literally), remember? All this thanks to something called cathode ray tube or CRT. Without them, we most probably would not be able to watch our favourite movies or series the way we do today. Now that we are...